NO SURRENDER HIROO ONODA PDF

He was the penultimate Japanese soldier to surrender, with Teruo Nakamura surrendering later in When he was 17 years old, he went to work for the Tajima Yoko trading company in Wuhan , China. On 26 December , he was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with a group of Japanese soldiers who had been sent there previously.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — No Surrender by Hiroo Onoda. Charles S. Terry Translator. In the spring of , Second Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese Army made world headlines when he emerged from the Philippine jungle after a thirty-year ordeal.

Hunted in turn by American troops, the Philippine police, hostile islanders, and successive Japanese search parties, Onoda had skillfully outmaneuvered all his pursuers, convinced that World War II was still b In the spring of , Second Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese Army made world headlines when he emerged from the Philippine jungle after a thirty-year ordeal.

Hunted in turn by American troops, the Philippine police, hostile islanders, and successive Japanese search parties, Onoda had skillfully outmaneuvered all his pursuers, convinced that World War II was still being fought and that one day his fellow soldiers would return victorious. This account of those years is an epic tale of the will to survive that offers a rare glimpse of man's invincible spirit, resourcefulness, and ingenuity. A hero to his people, Onoda wrote down his experiences soon after his return to civilization.

This book was translated into English the following year and has enjoyed an approving audience ever since. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Hiroo Onoda. Lubang , Philippines. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about No Surrender , please sign up. See 1 question about No Surrender…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. Feb 22, Eadweard rated it it was amazing Shelves: military-war , japanese , non-fiction , non-fiction-read , memoires-diaries-letters. I read this in one sitting, I couldn't put it down. Five stars because of how crazy it sounds, it sounds like fiction, and the thing is, he wasn't unique, others like him also held out for years.

I didn't know what to feel, I felt pity, I felt awe perhaps a strong word? How can someone be so fanatically deluded? With all the leaflets, radio broadcasts, search parties, how can you still believe it's all a plot by the enemy? Amazing read. I believe he d I read this in one sitting, I couldn't put it down.

I believe he died last year or the year before, what a man. View 2 comments. Dec 06, Krista Claudine Baetiong rated it liked it Shelves: period-world-war-ii , non-fiction , author-asia.

This is the memoir of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines during World War II and held out there for the next thirty years in the belief that the war was still ongoing. When Japan began its rescue missions for their holdout soldiers several years after the war, Onoda thought of these efforts as mere American propaganda and evaded contact. This book offers an interesting insight about his passion to his duty, which is an act of honor to his Emperor and country.

Even when he was initially conflicted by the big difference between guerrilla warfare to which he was assigned and their usual open combat that embraces the Bushido Code, he had accepted his task without reservation. He was astute, diligent, and adaptive—cunning, too, which helped reinforce his jungle survival skills. I think a big percentage of his survival had to do with the abundance of food and water in Lubang forests, and the other essentials he and his comrades had procured or pilfered to be frank from the lowland residents.

That, and his strong commitment to stand fast to his soldierly duties against all odds. I first heard about Onoda from a brief discussion in History class, and later on, from a local TV documentary. He did not mention this in his book.

Mar 21, Benjamin Brown rated it it was amazing. This book was a random find of my brother's in a random antique shop's book sale. I read it on the flight home and I could not stop dreaming of the jungle for days afterward.

I've been interested in WWII since I was a small child, visiting museums and such, but often reading books concerned more with the vast strategic overview of the war THIS is the book that will explain the near-insane loyalty and tenacity of the individual This book was a random find of my brother's in a random antique shop's book sale. THIS is the book that will explain the near-insane loyalty and tenacity of the individual Japanese soldier during the war.

This book reminds me of a young adult style survival story in the way of The Hatchet or My Side of the Mountain, the kind that many American children routinely consume in middle school, except for the socio-political background which brings the entire affair to insane-o-ville. I find that I really respect Onoda. His story delves deeply into the mental state of a survivalist-warrior. Required reading for those who like the topic of guerrilla warfare, state-sponsored social engineering, or pure blood-and-guts stoies of naked determination.

This is what nationalism, intelligence, and pure chutzpah can result in. Oct 19, Aussie rated it really liked it. Onoda's story is well known and his book documents the events in straightforward fashion. It's a good read, but where the western reader will feel short-changed is in the lack of an adequate explanation of how Japanese military discipline produced such a warped result.

The strange and vain efforts of the Japanese government to bring Onoda out of the jungle will also leave readers scratching their heads. Still, it's a terrific tale that gives some insight into a culture that remains a mystery - Onoda's story is well known and his book documents the events in straightforward fashion. Still, it's a terrific tale that gives some insight into a culture that remains a mystery - and I speak as someone who lived in Tokyo for three years. View 1 comment. Apr 12, James Clark rated it it was amazing.

I just finished reading this book about Lt. In fact, I was in the U. Navy at the time of his final surrender in and was stationed in Misawa, Japan myself. I directly remember when this happened and I was amazed that there were still holdout soldiers from WWII hiding in the jungles. It made me wonder, at the time, how many other straggler Japanese soldiers there mig I just finished reading this book about Lt.

It made me wonder, at the time, how many other straggler Japanese soldiers there might be from Borneo to Malaysia and all the other islands in the Pacific that might still be holding out like this soldier did First of all, I have to say, that I deeply admire this man and his absolute conviction to carry out his orders - no matter what army or ideology such a soldier or military man serves or adheres to, I believe we must respect and honor his loyalty, bravery, absolute commitment to his duty and his country.

He went beyond and above the call of duty. As a fellow military man myself, and as an American, I salute Lt. Onoda because he demonstrated the highest caliber of the meaning of "duty" itself as well as being an outstanding officer of his country's military. I do not know if he ever received any official honors for his enduring duty, if he was ever recompensed by Japan for 30 years in the jungles or if the Japanese Government ever took the time to promote him albeit, after the fact , which I believe they should have done when he returned to Japan in I lost track of this incident in the following years but never forgot about it.

And now, in I finally get to read his personal story on the matter. Onoda finally passed away this year in January, at the age of 91 years old! I came to read his book not only because I had personally experienced this surrender in while stationed in Japan, but because I have relatives myself who are Japanese by marriage through my siblings and it has always seemed that I have had Japanese somewhere in my life associations my best friend as a child was Japanese-American.

I believe that I have, through life experiences, come to at least know something of the Japanese Culture and the mentality, habits, drives and thinking of the Japanese People. I realize that in EVERY war, the goal of governments is to dehumanize the enemy - even more so, if the enemy is the one who started the conflict. Yet, we must ALL remember And while their culture might demand of them Bushido thinking, under all the layers of culture, lies a human being who has all the needs that we do - the need for safety, food, shelter, respect, dignity, equity and most of all, love.

When we go to war we know we have to kill an enemy in compliance with our orders and our duty to our own country, regardless - and if we think we are killing an enemy and not a human being, it makes it easier to carry out that duty.

But he was also a product of his culture and his times. What clearly comes through all the pages of his book is that he was thoroughly and completely dedicated to his duty right on up to the day he surrendered in

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